x Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 22 July 2017

Travel Essentials: glove liners

Glove liners provide extra warmth, wick moisture away and are easy to wash. They also make a great lightweight alternative to gloves.

Icebreaker Merino Wool Gloves Unisex Glove Liner 200. Courtesy of Icebreaker
Icebreaker Merino Wool Gloves Unisex Glove Liner 200. Courtesy of Icebreaker

It has to be pretty cold outside to need not just gloves but liners as well. Indeed, intrepid Arctic explorers, skiers and motorcyclists have long adopted this layered approach to avoid frozen digits.

 

Icebreaker Merino Wool glove liner

Merino wool is an excellent fabric for glove liners. It is warm, breathable and easy to look after. It feels good next to the skin and is not itchy. These gloves are made from a blend of merino and a dash of Lycra, making them lightweight and flexible. If it is not very cold, use them on their own - they are much more nimble than normal gloves.

Available from www.ellis-brigham.com from US$34.59 (Dh127), plus shipping.

 

Patagonia Heavyweight glove liner

These glove liners are made from Capilene, a synthetic material made with recycled polyester. Durable, soft and quick to lift away moisture, they are easy to look after, can be washed in a washing machine and dry very quickly. These liners are made from Patagonia's warmest, "expedition-weight" fabric and work well in very cold conditions.

Available from www.amazon.com from $35 (Dh129), plus shipping.

 

Seirus Innovation Silk glove liner

Silk might not be as good as the latest man-made fibres in very cold conditions, but it does have a touch of opulence about it. Besides, silk is thin and smooth. As a result, these glove liners make it easy to slip the outer gloves on and off. They feel good next to your skin and wick away moisture quite well. They are, however, a bit delicate and easy to snag, so treat them with care.

Available from www.amazon.com from $13.97 (Dh51), plus shipping.