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Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 24 June 2018

Hermès Twilly perfume and Van Cleef jewels: what we're loving this month

Plus: the Momento Fendi Bugs Cushion collection; and two fashion books on Dries Van Noten  

Twilly d’Hermès by perfumer Christine Nagel. Photo by Quentin Bertoux
Twilly d’Hermès by perfumer Christine Nagel. Photo by Quentin Bertoux

Hermès

The Hermès Twilly silk scarf is a thing of great versatility: it can be wrapped around your head, tacked on to a handbag or, most famously, worn as a bow. Tutorials on how best to construct the playful Twilly bow are rampant on social media – that dynamic domain reigned over by stylish young women. It is to them that the house’s latest fragrance Twilly d’Hermès, by perfumer Christine Nagel, is dedicated. The scent is a twist of three ingredients: ginger, tuberose and sandalwood – an unusual combination, perhaps, but one that’s meant to reflect the free, cheerful and whimsical traits of youth. The colourful packaging comes expertly knotted like a scarf around the Twilly d’Hermès bottle, with a ribbon-tie of silk encircling the cap. Geneva-born perfume creator Nagel, who joined Hermès in 2014, is the nose behind such distinctive feminine fragrances as Galop d’Hermès and Eau des Merveilles Bleue for Hermès; plus Miss Dior Cherie, Dolce & Gabbana The One for Woman, Eau de Cartier, Chopard Madness and Versace Woman. Twilly d’Hermès is now available in-store and costs up to Dh565 for 85ml.

Courtesy Bertrand Moulin / Van Cleef & Arpels
Courtesy Bertrand Moulin / Van Cleef & Arpels

Van Cleef & Arpels

In jewellery, the circle represents love, trust and fidelity – that which is everlasting because it has no beginning and no end. Van Cleef & Arpels has looked to this symbol of eternity for two new designs for its Perlée collection, unadorned save for rows upon rows of beads encircling a bracelet and a ring. The individually polished gold beads are hand-placed across three or five curved rows, creating an opulent three-dimensional effect, while craftsmen also applied the house’s mirror-polishing technique to lend an iridescent sheen to the underside of the pieces. The bracelets are available in three sizes, and have a discrete clasp mechanism hidden under a single, larger bead. Gilded beads have appeared in the maison’s creations since the 1920s, initially by themselves and later paired with rubies, diamonds and pearls. The simplicity of the two new designs, though, is no less effective, because they embrace the 120-year-old maison’s tradition of superior craftsmanship. The circle continues.

Courtesy Fendi
Courtesy Fendi

Fendi

Maleficent eyes are situated in the centre of a rounded-square, or cushion-shaped, face. The number 12 indicates that this is, in fact, a watch, although it doesn’t quite look the part. The Swiss-made timepieces are part of the latest Momento Fendi Bugs Cushion collection, and are available in two distinct designs, catering to two separate consumers: those who prefer a more classic approach to luxury, and those who favour a bolder, more daring aesthetic. The first is a two-tone bracelet model, combining rose gold with stainless steel, and the second features a black lacquered dial and calfskin leather strap, with yellow-toned eyes. Both designs are set with two diamonds in place of the pupils, and every minute, at the moment when the minute and seconds hand align, the iconic Fendi logo is formed by the layering of the two. While timepieces depicting the Fendi bug faces are not new to the luxury market, this is the first time that the watches are available in on-trend cushion shapes, since previous versions featured circular cases.

Photo by Patrice Stable
Photo by Patrice Stable

Dries Van Noten

The work of fashion designer Dries Van Noten is being celebrated with the launch of two unique books that document a colourful career spanning 26 years. Having reached the milestone of 100 fashion collections, the designer is the subject of two retrospective tomes by Lannoo Publishers, which will launch in October. Entitled simply Dries Van Noten 1-50, and Dries Van Noten 51-100, the two books document a career that began in 1991, and take readers on a visual journey through 2,000 unique images. Described by The New York Times as “one of fashion’s most cerebral designers”, and considered to be an icon in his hometown of Antwerp, Van Noten is known for his highly intellectual approach to design, as well as his vivid use of pattern and a magpie’s eye for mixing references. Much of the text accompanying the photographs is written by Susannah Frankel (AnOther Magazine) and Tim Blanks (The Business of Fashion), who provide valuable insight into the collections. Covering both menswear and womenswear, these books are a detailed look at the work of a unique talent, and a must-buy for every serious fashion aficionado.

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