x Abu Dhabi, UAETuesday 25 July 2017

Gulf citizens offer various goals for the GCC summit

Sultan Al Qassemi's opinion article A collection of citizen voices urges the GCC to cooperate (December 5) addressed the concerns of ordinary Gulf citizens on the eve of the Gulf Cooperative Council summit in Abu Dhabi.

Sultan Bin Nasser Al Suwaidi, Governor of the UAE Central Bank, addresses a press conference for the GCC summit in Abu Dhabi. Readers express some goals they hope the summit will accomplish. Rich-Joseph Jacun/ The National
Sultan Bin Nasser Al Suwaidi, Governor of the UAE Central Bank, addresses a press conference for the GCC summit in Abu Dhabi. Readers express some goals they hope the summit will accomplish. Rich-Joseph Jacun/ The National

Sultan Al Qassemi's opinion article A collection of citizen voices urges the GCC to cooperate (December 5) addressed the concerns of ordinary Gulf citizens on the eve of the Gulf Cooperative Council summit in Abu Dhabi. I'm really honoured to be cited by my blog name as part of his article.

I really hope that the GCC leaders give women the right to pass their nationalities on to their children. We as GCC citizens need to invest in human resources and open the door to those people who would be potential stars.

AlBaron11, Abu Dhabi

 

At a time when some Gulf leaders believe that the region would have been controlled by pirates if US forces were not present, the need to create a joint force by GCC countries is more urgent than ever.

Long-term dependency on US forces will not be a good idea as their commitment is questionable, keeping in view their financial situation and the fact that their key indicators are pointing towards another depression.

In addition to this, a massive stockpile of Israeli nukes strongly tilts the power in the region towards them.

Farhan Qureshi, Dubai

 

Two opinions on choice of Qatar

The Fifa World Cup takes place every four years. Where it takes place is unimportant.

What is important is how the venue is decided upon and, more importantly, who decides where it takes place. The oligarchy that is Fifa appears to wield more disproportionate power than the UN Security Council. Millions upon millions of dollars are spent by nations trying to persuade the Fifa select committee members to vote for their bid.

That Fifa holds court in this way is disturbing, especially when royalty, heads of state and stalwarts of the game are thrown into the pot.

Brian Warren, Abu Dhabi

 

In reference to the sports article Fifa pushing the envelope with Qatar choice (December 3), I for one am happy for the change - and "change" seems to be the key word here which unfortunately doesn't work in favour of the English. C'est la vie. Quite frankly, the world and the World Cup must accept the reality that the western world is only part of the world and eastern nations are gaining wealth, influence and power (although their claims have always been valid).

I hope that we will see much more parity across the board at the administrative level regarding global events like the Fifa World Cup.

The changing of the guard has also been evidenced on the football pitch with a first time champion in Spain, and underdogs like Ghana making a impressive showing at the 2010 event.

Craig Young, Dubai

 

Advice on best UAE food blog

In reference to The UAE's best food blogs (December 1), I'd like to add that in my humble opinion, Lailablogs.com is by far the recipe blog that actually means business. I mean if you actually want to try a recipe, and not just read about it, that's where to go. It's also massive in terms of the number of recipes on file, and the most diverse in terms of cuisine, all with picture-by-picture instructions.

Ammara Alavi, Abu Dhabi

 

WikiLeaks is a force for good

The recent releases by WikiLeaks of the private comments of many political leaders have understandably made many political leaders cringe with embarrassment.

Nevertheless, for ordinary citizens like me, the leaks have been educative. Transparency and hard accountability are the cornerstones of the new world we are going to be living in. Politicians who do not accept this will have no place on the world stage in the future.

Many of them misuse their positions by ordering espionage targeting people they fear. WikiLeaks will be a great deterrent to such megalomaniacs, for they will not relish being under the powerful magnifying glasses of the general public.

Rajendra K Aneja, Dubai

 

In the news article Australia begins leaks investigation (November 30), the Australian foreign minister Kevin Rudd says: "Diplomacy exists for the purpose of conducting the confidential business of states - one state to another." Who exactly is "the state" in a democracy? Is it he, himself?

Apparently, Mr Rudd thinks he is a state and that the US secretary of state Hillary Clinton is another state and that these two states can meet in one room over lunch and talk privately.

Neither Mr Rudd nor Mrs Clinton are states, and while they are more than free to talk privately, in democracies the government is accountable to the people.

They do not function as overlords who threaten their subjects with the Australian federal police whenever they question their decisions.

George Georgiadis, Abu Dhabi