x Abu Dhabi, UAEWednesday 26 July 2017

France will miss Sarkozy

Their new Socialist president will not help the French weather its problems, a reader says. Other letter topics: Mawaqif, the NYPD, farm wages, the role of science and more.

Right-wing incumbent candidate Nicolas Sarkozy leaves by car after addressing his supporters following the second round results of the French Presidential elections in Paris at
Right-wing incumbent candidate Nicolas Sarkozy leaves by car after addressing his supporters following the second round results of the French Presidential elections in Paris at " La Mutualite" hall on May 6, 2012. His opponent Socialist candidate Francois Hollande was elected France's first Socialist president in nearly two decades on Sunday, dealing a humiliating defeat to incumbent Nicolas Sarkozy and shaking up European politics. AFP PHOTO / JACQUES DEMARTHON *** Local Caption *** 459125-01-08.jpg

I refer to Parking woes hit congested streets (May 7).

Mawaqif's motto is "parking made easier" and on their website they say they are "changing the reality of parking in Abu Dhabi. Less time searching for parking, more time to enjoy life."

What a joke. I spent over an hour looking for parking one night in the Tourist Club area where I live. I have a resident permit, but there are no places. I ended up driving to an area far from my apartment and getting a cab home.

I am sorry this was not thought out. I am absolutely disgusted with this current situation.

Neusha Farley, Abu Dhabi

I would rather have the inconvenience of manoeuvring into a tight spot than be unable to find one.

Before Mawaqif, parking was difficult but we helped each other. We left our mobile phone numbers on the windscreen. Passers-by would direct you out of a tight spot. We generally found parking.

Mawaqif has reduced the space previously available for parking by an estimated 40 to 60 per cent.

In the Tourist Club area some entire streets are designated "no parking" although comparable streets in other parts of the city do have spots laid out. Mawaqif needs to rethink some things.

Name withheld by request

NY police are obeying the laws

James Zogby's repeated diatribes about the New York Police Department, most recently Top-secret proof the NYPD has alienated US Muslims (May 6) are very amusing.

No laws were broken yet he constantly complains about "mockery" of his and the Arab community's rights.

If there is evidence of improprieties committed by the NYPD, someone should bring it up in court. I'm sure the US will spend taxpayers' money to hear his allegations of "mockery".

Nicholas York, Abu Dhabi

Show respect for farm labourers

I refer to Kerala's resurgence in agriculture is being cultivated by women (May 6).

Thank you for publishing this story of women's empowerment. This model can be adapted to work all over the world.

The service sector, including IT, banking and finance have come to dominate in policy, while agriculture has been neglected. But without farming, we would not have food or many raw materials.

There must be some sort of wage balance among agriculture, industry and the service sectors. The ratio worldwide should be something like 1:2:3 for farming, industry, and services, in that order.

It is time for global strategies to provide food, dignity and knowledge for all, to ensure peace and prosperity.

Dr Raju M Mathew, Al Ain

Expatriates need better health care

Thank you for bringing attention to the current health insurance system in the UAE and its implications on the expatriate population's long-term well-being (Health screening and the great insurance gap, May 5).

Apparently only those in the upper echelons enjoy premium health benefits, many of which are enjoyed by even blue-collar workers elsewhere. It saddens me that the authorities do not take the expatriate population's health seriously enough. Many of us live here until the end of our careers.

And the related story Reproductive health lies outside basic plan (May 5), it reminds us that when a couple is both mentally and emotionally affected by their inability to procreate, the uncaring attitude of health insurance providers adds much insult to injury.

Name withheld by request

Discoveries are good, not bad

I am surprised by Robert Matthews' comments (Why E may not equal MC squared, May 6).

Science is not about trying to prove how smart you are. It is about understanding the facts of why the universe behaves as it does, and how that can benefit us.

It is not some competition between man and nature, in the way he portrays. If new discoveries are made or old ones are revised, this is not "rain[ing] on their parade" and does not require them to "put a brave face on things".

Rather, it is a cause for celebration that we have a greater understanding, which is for the good of us all.

Peter Jenkins, Dubai

French will regret dumping Sarkozy

I understand that Europeans are upset about the need for austerity.

But the French cannot stick their heads in the sand by voting for a socialist (France sends Hollande to the Elysée, May 7) and expect everything to get better.

Similarly, I don't believe an extended period of intensified political tumult will be good for Greece.

Georges Dufour, Dubai