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Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 21 July 2018

Fashion Forward buzz Day 2: Palazzos and turbans, Hâshé and Sabaji

New to this season's FFWD is the presentation room where guests can have a close-up look, without the luxury of velour seating. Photo by Hafsa Lodi
New to this season's FFWD is the presentation room where guests can have a close-up look, without the luxury of velour seating. Photo by Hafsa Lodi

The Madinat Jumeirah Conference Centre at midday Saturday had entirely different atmosphere from the previous night’s bustling crowds.

The wicked assumption is that FFWD guests partied a little too hard at Frioul’s opening night party. Even the outdoor pavilions were abandoned, with the sun’s rays shining down with piercing force. Sweat patches are never in style, after all.

But by 2pm, the city’s fashion pack had arrived, eager for a new day of shows and industry talks. Again, some interesting street style was spotted. One woman looked like a contemporary Little Red Riding Hood, dressed in a sheer red kimono and gold headpiece. Attendees were seen wearing designs by local brands Mochi and Reemami, as well as embroidered denims from the upcoming denim collection by s*uce. There were printed palazzos and white midi skirts aplenty, along with some exotic turbans and interesting eyewear.

Guests attended presentations by FFWD newcomers Bouguessa and Arwa Al Banawi, and shows by Hâshé, Yousef Al-Jasmi, Aiisha Ramadan, Maral, Jean-Louis Sabaji, Dima Ayad, Hussein Bazaza and Zareena. Hâshé’s runway show commenced after a mere seven-minute delay — a welcoming wait after yesterday’s half hour late starts. Hâshé displayed a revitalizing maturity in her collar details, bird embroidery and revolutionary wool peplums, while Zareena’s peace-themed production left guests enthused and inspired. But the most talked-about designer by far was the Kuwaiti Yousef Al-Jasmi, whose glitzy gowns were expertly crafted from shimmery beadwork and flapper-like fringing. In glittering metallic shades of silver and antique gold, dresses featured provocatively placed cut-outs and dangerously high slits, leaving very little to the imagination.

artslife@thenational.ae