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Abu Dhabi, UAEWednesday 16 January 2019

Election results send message to Indian politicians

Readers say Narendra Modi's victory has sent a clear message to politicians that they should not misuse people's trust in them. Other topics: traditions, Ask Ali
Readers say the election victory of Narendra Modi sent a clear message to India’s politicians that they need to deliver on their promises and should not consider public support as a licence to make money. Prakash Singh / AFP
Readers say the election victory of Narendra Modi sent a clear message to India’s politicians that they need to deliver on their promises and should not consider public support as a licence to make money. Prakash Singh / AFP

The people of India have once again asserted themselves by voting for a change (Modi and BJP sweep to power with outright majority, May 17).

The BJP ran a brilliant marketing campaign to promote their leader, Narendra Modi, as well as its development and good governance agenda. Mr Modi has been delivering in his home state Gujarat for the past 14 years, and has campaigned hard against Congress and the Gandhi family while maintaining his dignity. The Gandhi family took the campaign to a new low, making personal attacks on Mr Modi. Many Congress heroes have fallen by the wayside.

Congress has lost miserably because of its indifference to the public and its poor performance. During its reign, inflation skyrocketed, corruption touched new highs and infrastructure projects were stalled. This is the worst performance of the party since India gained independence.

The Aam Aadmi Party (AAP), India’s new party of hope, which I joined with enthusiasm, has performed poorly. The party fielded more than 400 candidates, but only four of them won. The party has a massive work to do in terms of organisation building.

The message of this election is clear: deliver your promises and do not consider public support as a licence to make money. Now the new government should build a competent team to address some of the crucial issues the country has been facing.

The new government must start now because the euphoria will last for a short time. There is no time to waste.

Rajendra K Aneja, Dubai

The election results clearly indicate people’s anger and frustration against the Congress-led UPA government’s misgovernance as well as its indifferent attitude. The moral of this story: don’t ignore people’s power. Narendra Modi should take this message and start delivering results if he wants the BJP to remain in power. Congratulation to Mr Modi and the BJP.

K Ragavan, US

The new government should try to turn the promises made by the previous administrations into reality.

The verdict was straightforward that a change is needed, which the century-old Congress cannot bring.

People, however, should wait patiently as Mr Modi wield his magic wand.

Ramachandran Nair, Oman

The result truly reflects desires and aspirations of the Indian people. The sad part is that Indians continue to dream of things they had been dreaming more than a decade ago. I hope the new government fulfils some of our dreams, if not all of them.

Varsha John, Abu Dhabi

Some traditions are not desirable

A tradition is something that has been passed on from one generation to the next – but traditions are not necessarily good or desirable (Why kill a tradition? May 16).

As we evolve we come to recognise that many past traditions are, in fact, immensely cruel and totally unjustifiable. Such is the case with bull wrestling in India. I am overjoyed to learn that bull wrestling has been banned in India but I will be over the moon if Spain follows suit and bans bull fighting.

Jenny Moxham, Australia

Honesty hallmark of Ask Ali column

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again that I love reading the Ask Ali column.

I most admire the honesty that is apparent in most of the replies, such as in Should abayas be attracting attention and explaining wudu (May 15), where Ali Al Saloom admits that the abayas we see today on Muslim women defeat the very purpose of wearing one. And he is spot on when he asks people not to judge a woman by her abaya.

But I believe this is more of an issue when in western countries, for the rare few who don’t leave their abayas behind when they travel.

I’d also like to add that although Ali isn’t an Islamic scholar, when replying to queries on Islam, his use of logic as well as examples that a non-Muslim can relate to, is impressive.

Name withheld by request

Updated: May 17, 2014 04:00 AM

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