x Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 24 July 2017

Economic growth comes from good governance

Egyptians participate in the 'Million Man March' in Cairo. Readers draw various lessons from the massive protest demonstrations in Egypt. Andrew Henderson / The National
Egyptians participate in the 'Million Man March' in Cairo. Readers draw various lessons from the massive protest demonstrations in Egypt. Andrew Henderson / The National

In reference to the business article on Egypt and the Middle East, Turmoil might boost economic change (February 2), the writing on the wall in the Middle East is now clear: those corrupt and dictatorial regimes which haven't fed or cared for their people are falling with astonishing speed through revolution.

While there is euphoria on the streets today, democracy and progress with public consensus will still take some time as Iraq's example illustrates (regardless of the US occupation).

The contrast between Gulf states and others (despite many having oil resources) could not be more stark. There already seems to be capital flight to the GCC from other Middle Eastern nations.

The lessons from an enlightened elite building enviable wealth just several decades ago are now being belatedly paid lip service by failed regimes. As the Chinese say, "May you live in interesting times."

Athar Mian, Abu Dhabi

A tale of hope, not desperation

The news article Egypt, a desperate nation now running on empty (February 1) described the economic struggles of Ghada Youssef, an English teacher and divorced mother of two.

This week is probably the first time that she feels hopeful that she might finally have the chance to take control of her life and her future.

However, I am very disappointed in the title of this article, which does not reflect the new-found pride and strength that the millions of Egyptians are feeling today on its streets.

May I suggest the title Egypt, a newly-awakened nation now running on full power.

Ameera Samy, Abu Dhabi

Organisation lacking at match

The sports article One mistake cost us, says Osieck (January 30) described how Japan won the Asian Cup by a 1-0 victory over the coach Holger Osiek's Australian team.

However, the organisation of the game was faulty. Gates were closed 30 minutes before start of the game. Thousands of ticket holders were prevented from going into the stadium and to top it all off, aggressive police in riot gear was used to push back a crowd made up of families with children, women and men who just wanted to use their legitimately purchased tickets.

The Qatar Football Association owes football fans a huge apology. Many lessons need to be learned before the 2020 World Cup, that's for sure.

Jarek Michalski, Abu Dhabi

Questions on fines for photos

I refer to Two fined for taking photos at Yas circuit (February 1). So now the public has to ask if it's OK to take photos of public buildings in Abu Dhabi or risk imprisonment?

This seems to be an archaic law. We sometimes forget where we live, with all the dazzling new structures, massive developments, major sporting events in the attempt to put the UAE's name on the global map and then we find that two poor guys were fined for taking a photo of one of these iconic developments.  Back down to earth with a bang.

Adil Ali, Abu Dhabi

The root problem of speeding

The front page news article Police patrols will pull over speeding drivers (January 28) reported that speed cameras and a new central control system will alert passing police cars to speeding offenders.

Recently on a trip from Al Ain to Abu Dhabi, I was following a police vehicle. We were both doing 135km/h. In the fast lane, right next to the police car, a car with heavily tinted windows (illegal tinting) came right up behind another vehicle which was travelling next to the police car, bullying it into moving over.

The other car nearly hit the police car as it was forced to take evasive action as the other driver forced past (dangerous driving). The faster car then sped past and disappeared into the distance (speeding).

What did the police car do? Absolutely nothing. Three infractions that I could see, but the police car did nothing. What will happen when they are notified of speeders, according to this article? I think nothing.

All the posturing and news articles in the world will not change the dangerous driving habits of this country unless the police are actually willing to take action.

Liz, Al Ain

I was quite alarmed to hear on the radio that 30 people were killed in traffic accidents in February last year in Abu Dhabi. A recent report from the London police has confirmed that a total of nine people were killed in traffic-related accidents in London in the whole of 2010. These figures are quite startling and illustrate the need for safer driving and pedestrian facilities.

Colin Hill, Abu Dhabi

Questions on fines for photos

I refer to Two fined for taking photos at Yas circuit (February 1). So now the public has to ask if it's OK to take photos of public buildings in Abu Dhabi or risk imprisonment?

This seems to be an archaic law. We sometimes forget where we live, with all the dazzling new structures, massive developments, major sporting events in the attempt to put the UAE's name on the global map and then we find that two poor guys were fined for taking a photo of one of these iconic developments.  Back down to earth with a bang.

Adil Ali, Abu Dhabi