x Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 28 July 2017

Concern over road safety

Readers comment on the bus fire in Dubai, and road safety in general. Other topics: India's economy and credit cards.

A reader expresses concern for the passengers of a shuttle bus that caught fire in Dubai. Witnesses said nobody was hurt in the fire, which was extinguished by emergency services personnel. The National / courtesy Bryanne Tait
A reader expresses concern for the passengers of a shuttle bus that caught fire in Dubai. Witnesses said nobody was hurt in the fire, which was extinguished by emergency services personnel. The National / courtesy Bryanne Tait

Enforcement and etiquette will help make roads safer

I am writing in reference to Fixed pay for lorry drivers could put the brakes on risky driving (March 3).

What is needed is a proper mechanism to verify driving quality.

Too many motorists violate traffic laws, endangering pedestrians and fellow road users.

If a driver sticks to the speed limit, he or she is rewarded with tailgating, flashing lights and undertaking.

Until and unless there is a concerted effort to clamp down on these habits, nothing will change.

Emphasis should be put on driving etiquette that breeds good manners instead of aggressive driving. Restrictions should be imposed on young drivers having high-performance cars, and repeat offenders should not be let off lightly.

I'd like to see more unmarked police cars patrolling major roads, and a television campaign designed to turn bad driving into a social taboo.

Joe Burns, Abu Dhabi

Concern over vehicle fires

I was concerned to read Motorist escapes after his car burst into flames (March 1), about separate fires in a hotel shuttle bus and a car on Dubai roads.

The bus fire was quite shocking. I hope everyone in and around the vehicle are fine following this bizarre incident.

Fatima Suhail, Dubai

I note that the car fire occurred at the Al Safa interchange.

I hate driving in that area; there are way too many accidents.

Teri Adams, Dubai

India desperately needs leadership

Congratulations on the insightful editorial, India's budget is a missed opportunity (March 3).

The editorial is right to point out that the 10 per cent surcharge on the rich will not pay for the various subsidies and spending in poorer areas.

It is also significant that the surcharge will really be paid by professionals in the corporate sector whose taxes are deducted at source.

The really wealthy classes in India - the builders and business owners - will be able to skirt this new tax.

This budget is clearly an election budget designed to please. It has popular measures, but it is devoid of any growth strategies. Recent GDP growth rates have declined from 9 per cent to 4.5 per cent, despite optimistic forecasts of 6.5 per cent.

The ruling Congress party will buy loyalty through the cash transfer scheme, now dubbed "direct benefit transfer".

This offer of free money without work will exacerbate inflation and laziness. The philosophy seems to be that when you cannot win the masses over with performance, just pay them off.

The unemployment rate will remain at between 10 and 15 per cent. Millions of youngsters need meaningful jobs.

Public faith in the competence, integrity and maturity of political leaders will take a further thrashing in 2013.

India desperately needs leaders with character and courage, who will deliver real growth to the nation's economy. Rajendra K Aneja, India

Pleased at payout for injured woman

It was encouraging to read Dh200,000 awarded to woman injured in hotel (February 28).

I believe there are still some further legal stages to go through, but I am very pleased for the woman, Natalie Creane, and her family.

Diane Petty, UK

Card change no credit to bank

Until recently, my husband and I were customers of Lloyds TSB in Dubai.

We had Visa debit cards and were able to book airline tickets online, pay for hotels, and set up regular payments to pay our mobile phone, home phone and utility bills.

Then Lloyds was sold to HSBC, with all customer accounts transferred last month.

Since the transition, we have been issued with new Visa debit cards which cannot be used for online purchases or to set up regular bill payments.

Instead, the bank is pushing us to get a credit card. This is having a huge effect on the way we are able to manage our finances and bill payments.

At a time when so many people in the world are getting themselves into debt that they cannot manage, I don't think banks should be encouraging people to take out credit cards.

Kathryn Mills, Dubai