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Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 16 November 2018

Apple launches new Macs and iPads - latest from New York event

Apple will try to pull laptops and tablets out from under iPhone's shadow

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks at the start of an Apple special event at the Howard Gilman Opera House at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. EPA
Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks at the start of an Apple special event at the Howard Gilman Opera House at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. EPA

Apple is launching a refreshed line-up of Mac computers and iPads in Brooklyn on Tuesday.

Follow the latest news pictures as it happens here.

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iOS 12.1 is shipping out tonight

This includes the already announced dual sim support with eSims.

US singer Lana Del Rey wraps things up.

Apple chief Tim Cook and US singer Lana Del Ray. EPA
Apple chief Tim Cook and US singer Lana Del Ray. EPA

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New iPad Pro

Apple CEO Tim Cook presents new products, including new Macbook laptops, during a special event at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Howard Gilman Opera House October 30, 2018, in New York. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY
Apple CEO Tim Cook presents the new iPad. AFP

Tim Cook is back. "Today we're announcing an all new iPad Pro." Cue promo video.

Tablet sales are declining, but iPad saw an increase in sales to 44m. It has a 27% market share.

Tim introduces Jon Ternus from the iPad division who delivers the details:

  • Face ID - no home button
  • Liquid retina screen
  • 11" and 12.9" screens
  • 1 TB in storage capacity

COST: 11" at $799 for the 64GB version. The 12.9" Pro starts at $999.

Unveiled alongside the new iPad is the Apple Pencil. It clips onto the iPad like a magnet.

Next up is a segment on Augmented Reality and apps - particularly games in the works - including fresh announcement of Photoshop on the iPad.

President of 2K Sports, Greg Thomas, speaks about NBA 2k on the new iPad Pro. EPA
President of 2K Sports, Greg Thomas, speaks about NBA 2k on the new iPad Pro. EPA

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Mac Mini returns

Apple CEO Tim Cook presents new products during a special event at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Howard Gilman Opera House October 30, 2018, in New York. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY
The Mac Mini. AFP

Considering it's near Halloween, one could say Apple's smallest and cheapest computer is back from the dead.

Tom Boger, head of Mac production marketing comes out to speak for the mini.

He describes a massive boost in performance with quad and six-core processors and 64GB of faster memory. Prices start at $799.

Apple Senior Director of Mac Hardware Product Marketing, Tom Boger, speaks about the new Mac mini. EPA
Apple Senior Director of Mac Hardware Product Marketing, Tom Boger, speaks about the new Mac mini. EPA

All Mac minis now use faster flash storage as well with capacities up to 2 terabytes, Applesaid. It also goes on sale today, Apple said.

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MacBook Air from $1199

Tim Cook hands over to Laura Grove who gets us started with replacement for the MacBook Air.

The new laptop comes with a 13" Retina display, Touch ID, the latest processors and an even more portable design to the world’s most loved notebook and Thunderbolt 3 ports.

Apple CEO Tim Cook presents new products, including new Macbook laptops, during a special event at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Howard Gilman Opera House October 30, 2018, in New York. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY
Apple CEO Tim Cook presents new products, including new Macbook laptops, during a special event at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Howard Gilman Opera House October 30, 2018, in New York. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY

The Air, first released in 2010, comes with a Touch ID fingerprint scanner for logging on, a larger trackpad, and better speakers.

The new MacBook Air is 10 per cent thinner than the previous model and is a quarter-pound lighter. It has the same 12 hour battery life as the previous model. The Air’s aluminum casing is made from 100 per cent recycled aluminum, Apple said.

It goes on sale today.

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Opening words from CEO Tim Cook

Apple Chief Tim Cook opens proceedings at the Brooklyn Academy of Music to unveil the latest.

He says "we're here today to talk about our most creative products... the Mac."

He talks about Apple's market segment and penetration into China.

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Preamble - facial recognition for iPads

Apple is expected to unveil updates to its Mac computers and iPads that include facial recognition features that have been available in the iPhone lineup at an event in Brooklyn.

Analysts expect a new versions of Apple's iPad Pro, its higher-end tablet computer that competes with the Microsoft Surface, with thinner bezels and more screen space, along with the face unlock system found on Apple's newer iPhones.

They also expect updates to the firm's Mac lineup such as redesigned MacBook Air, Apple's $999 entry-level laptop.

Apple introduced new iPhones and Apple Watches last month, but the older product lines accounted for $45 billion in sales in the most recent fiscal quarter. In comparison, iPhones brought in revenue of $141.3 billion.

"They really wanted to show the world they haven't forgotten about the iPad and the Mac," said Mika Kitagawa, a senior principal research analyst at Gartner.

Apple declined to comment.

In July when Apple reported its most recent quarter, the company had its worst quarter of Mac sales since 2010, with unit volumes down 13 percent year over year. And iPad unit sales were up only 1 percent versus a year earlier, and revenue for both was down 5 percent from the prior year.

But some of that dip in Mac sales was explained by timing - Apple waited to release new Macs until July, when it had in previous years offered them in June. More broadly, Macs sales growth has outpaced the PC market and the iPad has been the most successful tablet in a market that simply turned out to be smaller than Apple hoped when it released the device in 2010.

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks with a MacBook Air behind him during an Apple special event. EPA
Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks with a MacBook Air behind him during an Apple special event. EPA

While Apple has held prices down on some items like its entry-level iPads for schools, analyst do not expect it to do so with iPad Pros or Maclaptops. With Mac laptops in particular, consumers increasingly use phones or tablets for quick computing tasks and only reach for a full-fledged computer when they need extra horsepower. Apple is unlikely to cut corners to drop the price of its entry-level laptops, analysts said.

"With Apple, 'cheap' is always more expensive than everybody else," said Carolina Milanesi, an analyst at Creative Strategies. Apple is likely to pick a price where "you don't feel like you're breaking the bank, but you don't feel like you're compromising your experience."