x Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 21 July 2017

Moore's Law to stay as rule of thumb

Computers will continue to get more and more powerful, according to the world's largest chip maker.

Computers will continue to get more and more powerful, according to the world's largest chip maker.

A principle called Moore's Law - named after Intel's co-founder Gordon Moore - has applied to the world of computing for decades. It states that the number of transistors that can be placed inexpensively on an integrated circuit doubles every two years, which means that computing power is increasing exponentially.

Justin Rattner, the chief technology officer at Intel, dispels the notion that trend is about to expire.

"We really see quite a healthy outlook for Moore's Law," he says. "Everybody seems to enjoy predicting the end of Moore's Law - I guess it's much more interesting predicting the continuation."

Intel faces heavy competition from its rivals, which have made headway in producing more efficient, cheap processors for the mobile phone market. But Mr Rattner says Intel will continue to make faster chips, as well as invest in research to reduce power consumption.

"The next couple of generations will actually represent more change than we've seen in the last four decades. All that has to do with the fact that we're bumping up against fundamental physics, and it requires a lot of innovation."

Mr Rattner, who joined the company in 1973, predicted a number of technology trends for next year. These include a growth in "smart TV" products, as well as "context-aware" computing, in which devices react to their surroundings and even sense a user's mood.

 

bflanagan@thenational.ae