x

Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 24 June 2018

China's Didi set to muscle in on Uber in Mexico

Didi is thinking bigger than Uber, with ambitions for bike-sharing, scooters and motorcycles in Mexico, people familiar with the matter say

A woman walks past ride-hailing company Didi Chuxing's booth at the Global Mobile Internet Conference 2017 in Beijing. The company is gearing up for a battle to knock Uber off its perch in Mexico. Jason Lee/Reuters
A woman walks past ride-hailing company Didi Chuxing's booth at the Global Mobile Internet Conference 2017 in Beijing. The company is gearing up for a battle to knock Uber off its perch in Mexico. Jason Lee/Reuters

Working quietly from a shared office space in one of Mexico City's trendiest neighbourhoods, China's ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing is planning to hit its arch rival Uber where it hurts.

Mexico is one of Uber's most prized and profitable markets. The San Francisco firm boasts a near monopoly here, with seven million users in more than three dozen cities. Which is precisely why Didi wants to knock Uber from that comfortable perch.

To learn how to conquer Uber, the Chinese firm is going straight to the source. It is poaching Uber employees for its Mexico management team. Didi employees are riding incognito with Uber drivers and chatting up passengers to pinpoint weaknesses, according to people familiar with its strategy. And Didi is thinking bigger than Uber, with ambitions for bike-sharing, scooters and motorcycles in Mexico, the people say.

The Chinese firm has deep pockets, thanks to blue-chip global investors that include Apple and Japan's SoftBank Group. In the past year alone, it has pulled in nearly $10 billion to help fund global expansion.

But whether Didi can beat its nemesis there is far from certain. Mexico is the Chinese firm's first attempt at building an operation from scratch outside Asia - a costly gambit.

What is clear is that Didi is under pressure to keep growing to justify its $56bn valuation. Latin America is the newest battleground for the old rivals, and Didi will be in enemy territory.

Didi Chuxing Technology is the world's largest ride-hailing firm by number of rides, thanks to its commanding market share in China, where it has 450 million users. It completed more than 7.4 billion rides last year, not quite double Uber's count.

Uber learned the hard way about Didi's brawn. After waging an expensive campaign to crack the Chinese market, Uber in 2016 sold its operation to Didi in exchange for a 17.5 per cent stake in the Chinese firm, which also made a $1bn investment in Uber.

The titans continue to lock horns as they race to carve up the rest of the globe. Uber is the top dog in Latin America, where Brazil and Mexico rank among its largest markets outside the United States. In Mexico, Uber held an 87 per cent market share as of August, according to Dalia Research, a Berlin-based consumer research firm.

Didi wants to change that in Mexico, where it began recruiting employees last year.

The company declined to talk openly about its plans, but details of its strategy are emerging.

Nestled on the ninth floor of a WeWork shared office building in the capital's Juarez neighbourhood, Didi is building an operation from the ground up. In foreign markets such as India and the Middle East, it purchased stakes in existing companies. But Uber is so dominant in Mexico that there is no clear investment opportunity in a local competitor, according to people familiar with Didi's thinking.

Hungry for experienced talent, Didi is aggressively recruiting current and former Uber employees, offering to nearly double their salaries in some cases, two people with knowledge of the matter said.

At the helm of Didi's Mexico operation is Uber veteran Lin Ma, who helped launch Uber's ill-fated venture in China. Now Didi's director of international operations, Mr Ma also worked on operations at 99, the Brazilian ride-hailing startup that Didi purchased at the end of last year, according to his LinkedIn profile.

Mr Ma and others at Didi have so far poached at least five Uber managers and specialists in Mexico who have experience in operations, logistics, strategy, marketing and driver training, a review of LinkedIn profiles shows.

Mr Ma declined to comment.

_______________

Read more:

Didi, Softbank eye Japanese ride-hailing market

Nissan to pilot robo-vehicle service as it looks to compete with Uber

_______________

The company has yet to recruit drivers, and it is not clear which cities it will enter first, according to a person familiar with Didi's strategy.

Rather than compete solely on price, the person said, Didi plans to promote safe drivers and fast response times; the company has built an algorithm to help it predict 15 minutes in advance where it should dispatch vehicles. Didi is also considering offering bike-sharing, scooters and motorcycles in Mexico, while Uber so far has stuck to ride-hailing. A broad array of transport options helped Didi prevail in China.

But the biggest difference may come down to cash. To protect drivers, the person said, Didi will not handle cash fares in Mexico.

Uber, meanwhile, has pushed Mexican policymakers hard for the right to accept cash in a region where tens of millions lack bank accounts. The move has generated business, along with controversy.

In Brazil, Uber saw a surge of robberies and murders of its drivers after the company began accepting cash there, according to a 2017 Reuters analysis. Uber says it has added tools to authenticate riders' identities, better protecting drivers.

Mexico has not seen a similar wave of attacks so far. Nevertheless, Uber's position puts it at odds with regulators in some Mexican states.

While Didi appears to be sidestepping that obstacle, it faces cultural hurdles in Latin America, according to Daisy Wu, head of international business at Yeahmobi, which helps Chinese startups go global.

Latin American consumers generally prefer U.S. brands to Chinese brands, she said, and Chinese business culture can be off-putting to local employees.

Ms Wu said most of the Chinese companies that have gone to Latin America are still trying to be successful.

Didi, for example, bewildered Mexico job candidates by trying to schedule interviews during the week of Christmas.

Uber's lead in Latin America, meanwhile, has taken on heightened importance as it prepares for a potential initial public offering next year.

The company, which lost $4.5bn last year, is facing fierce competition at home and in Asia, and a regulatory crackdown in Europe. It is also recovering from a year of scandals that saw co-founder Travis Kalanick forced out as chief executive in June amid multiple federal criminal probes and a workplace marred by sexual harassment allegations.

Andrew Macdonald, Uber's vice president of operations for Latin America and Asia Pacific, said Uber is prepared to do what it takes to remain dominant in Mexico, a profitable market amid a sea of losses, whether that's more spending on customer acquisition or more deeply engaging with existing customers.

Uber is committed to maintaining cheap fares for its basic service to keep its Mexican customers loyal, Mr Macdonald said. But he said the company is considering adding more ride options such as upscale cars that would boost revenue.

If Uber is nervous about Didi stealing its lead in Mexico, it is not showing it. Mr Macdonald said the learning curve is steep, something its rival is about to find out.

Didi has significant bankroll, but there are significant local complexities, he said.

Reuters