x Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 28 July 2017

Barcelona and Real Madrid have an unrealistic persecution complex

Barca claimed a plot against them after a spate of what they considered to be poor refereeing decisions against them and favourable ones towards Real Madrid.

Jose Mourinho reacts during Real Madrid's La Liga match against Villarreal.
Jose Mourinho reacts during Real Madrid's La Liga match against Villarreal.

One of the least edifying aspects of Spanish football are the claims of bias by a big two too familiar with getting their own way.

Contempt has replaced trust in authority and conspiracy theories flourish. Encouraged by a media which actively seeks controversy, there is no shortage of self-important individuals attached to the top two who are willing to speak their mind.

If a player won't speak, then a director or president will. If they are in verbal lockdown then a former player will suffice.

Most do talk and even those like Pep Guardiola who try to take a high-handed attitude and stay clear of controversy are prone to lashing out occasionally.

Earlier this season, Barcelona claimed a plot against them after a spate of what they considered to be poor refereeing decisions against them and favourable ones towards Real Madrid.

There was not, but it coincided with Real going 10 points ahead. Now that gap has closed to six it is Real who are letting their nerves show and seeking to divert blame.

Two Real players, the coach Jose Mourinho and the physio were sent off as more points were dropped against Villarreal last week before Pepe swore at the referee in the tunnel.

Barcelona and Real may think otherwise, but the world is not against them. It just doesn't always see things like they do through their one-sided and self-serving eyes.

They seldom lose, but when they do people would have more respect if they did it gracefully.