x Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 24 July 2017

Authorities must be more strict with errant drivers

Training for heavy vehicle drivers and safety-rule implementation are key to curbing accidents. Other topics include: medicines, art

A reader says heavy vehicle drivers must undergo training every year or two. Twenty-four people were killed when a lorry ploughed into the back of a bus in Al Ain on Monday. Silvia Razgova / The National
A reader says heavy vehicle drivers must undergo training every year or two. Twenty-four people were killed when a lorry ploughed into the back of a bus in Al Ain on Monday. Silvia Razgova / The National

I am shocked to read about the accident in Al Ain in which so many people died (24 killed in worst road tragedy, February 5). It's surely one of the worst road accidents in the UAE. I pray for the departed souls.

At the same time, I would like to urge the authorities to be more strict with those who violate traffic rules. Some of the buses transporting labourers tend to exceed speed limits. It's especially scary to see heavy vehicles speeding during rush hours. They pose a grave danger to others on the road.

I suggest heavy vehicle drivers undergo training every year or two. That should be mandatory and linked to the renewal of their licences.

Companies handling heavy vehicles should also think about having safety experts.

Employees of such firms should seek safety training at authorised institutes to give continuous guidance to drivers on road safety.

Ramesh Menon, Abu Dhabi

 

Old Truck Road is dangerous

I was driving on Old Truck Road in November last year, when a lorry came dangerously close behind my car.

At one point, it almost hit me and I turned around and gestured for him to back off and maintain some distance between our vehicles. He did, but it's upsetting that I had to do all this to make him obey a basic driving rule. I offer my condolences to the bereaved family members.

Teri Adams, Abu Dhabi

Cheaper drugs will benefit all

Price of medicine cut by up to 40% (January 4) is good news. In fact, this will help insurance companies that are being fleeced for no reason. In the UAE, no pharmacy will give you less than a strip of tablets. Most of these medicines are expensive, as they are imported from western countries.

Now, if one has to buy medicine over the counter, one will be able to afford it. I am surprised that insurance companies make profits. The UAE should think of importing medicines cheaply from countries such as India, which exports drugs to other parts of the world.

Vijaykumar KB, Bangalore

Investing in art is a complex matter

Thank you for the fantastic article by Tony Glover, The art of investing in Swag (February 2). You are right to emphasise the complexity and challenges of investing in art.

It is also good to note that many Middle East artworks - by both established and emerging artists - have yet to reach their full potential as assets.

Colin Lewis, Dubai