x Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 21 July 2017

Why James Cameron is fed up with 3D treatment

James Cameron, whose films Avatar and Titanic are the highest-grossing movies of all time, has criticised studios that add 3D to their films post-production.

James Cameron, whose films Avatar and Titanic are the highest-grossing movies of all time, has criticised studios that add 3D to their films post-production.

Presumably spurred on by the recent news that Warner Bros has had to ditch its 3D version of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (so as not to push back the release date of the 2D version) Cameron made his feelings abundantly clear at a media event in Beverly Hills.

The director also went on to say that the process of adding 3D characteristics to a 2D film, which is called 3D retrofitting, should only be used on classic films such as Jaws, ET or, surprise surprise, Titanic.

Of course, others might go further and question whether adding such effects to even much-loved movies is entirely, if at all, necessary.

Sure, seeing Jack Nicholson's face literally bursting out of the screen during the "Here's Johnny!" scene in The Shining might be quite an experience, but we're pretty sure it won't make any real difference to fans of the original version.

The same goes for the Spielberg classic, ET. We have a feeling that watching his finger poking out towards an enthralled audience would be a sweet, if not entirely necessary, addition. In general though, we're with Cameron on this one.

Just imagine the last scene in Casablanca, only this time around with Ingrid Bergman's tears flowing right out of the screen. We'll always have the original.