x Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 28 July 2017

The Final Destination

The deaths are satisfyingly elaborate but the 3D is rubbish.

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Remember the headache you got from Avatar? This is much worse - and the 3D is rubbish, to boot. Because the tricks used by cinemas don't work with ordinary TVs, you can't get full-colour 3D at home (yet; the electronics industry is mistakenly convinced that home 3D is the next big thing). For now, we're stuck with a very slight advance on the 3D of the 1980s: cardboard specs that send the red picture to one eye, and green and blue to the other. The result is washed-out colours, and a flickering red cast as your brain tries to figure out what's going on. Sometimes you'll manage it, and the colour will look sort of right and sort of steady for a few minutes. You'll even flinch a few times as objects hurtle out of the screen. Mostly, though, you'll get the urge to go and sit in a darkened room. Thankfully there's also a standard DVD in the box. So: Nick (Bobby Campo) has a premonition of doom at the speedway and escapes, saving his chums. But Death Must Have Its Way, preferably in as grisly a manner as possible. If you're looking for a by-the-numbers teenage gore flick in which at least half the time you're willing the knives, nails or bathtubs (really) to do their worst - so unlikeable are the characters - the 2D disc is the one to go for and would be worth a three-star rating. The deaths are satisfyingly elaborate, and even if some of the CGI is slightly wonky the producers clearly didn't skimp on the ketchup. But if you want 3D, go and see Avatar again. At least that has six-legged horses.