x Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 23 July 2017

Pakistan: foundering in the wake of Partition

No punches are held as the cricket legend Imran Khan muses on his country's turbulent years following Partition, taking note of its leaders' failures and the struggles of its citizens.

Though his name needs no introduction to cricket fans, it is its juxtaposition with his homeland that Imran Khan emphasises in his new book, Pakistan, subtitled a "Personal History". Naturally, there are enough mentions of his contribution to sport as well as his marriage to, then separation from, his wife, Jemima Goldsmith, but it is the eponymous nation that takes centre-stage here.

No punches are withheld as Khan muses on Pakistan's turbulent years following Partition, taking note of its leaders' failures and the struggles of its citizens.

The "personal" part of this history is realised through Khan's years spent treading social and political waters on his path to helping to build a better nation. Indeed, names are named and blamed as his political compatriots (often, his opponents) are criticised for their shortcomings in running national affairs.

Current President Asif Ali Zardari isn't spared either; Khan has plenty to say about the ramifications of the war on terror.

Suffice to say, Khan makes for an earnest narrator. However, here's wishing him good luck on how the subjectivity of his book is perceived by less objective readers.