x Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 22 July 2017

Lego’s rise and resurgence

In the 1990s, Lego stagnated with the advent of computer games. It took drastic reorganisation and well-timed risks to get the toy giant back to its feet by 2003.

Few toys have had the same cultural impact as the humble Lego brick. With millions upon millions of construction sets sold and an international fan base ranging far beyond its targeted school-age demographic, the Lego company has come far to cement its place in contemporary culture from its origins in a Danish carpenter’s workshop.

Founded by Ole Kirk Christiansen in 1932, the first Lego bricks were made of wood, befitting the style of most toys at the time. But as noted by the writers, it didn’t take long for the company to break free from the traditional set-up and take their first steps towards the innovation they are currently renowned for.

While their efforts were initially rewarded with rapid growth for several decades, the 90s saw Lego stagnate with the advent of computer games. It takes drastic reorganisation and well-timed risks to get the toy giant back to its feet by 2003.

It’s a long and winding path, but the story of how Lego came to be and, more importantly, how it stayed on top, is one worth a read for those looking for inspiration.