Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 18 September 2020

Flashes of brilliance: 26 truly dramatic weather photos

Stunning scenes of weather from around the world are competing to win an esteemed prize from The Royal Meteorological Society

From theatrical storms to icy scenes and ethereal lighting, the 26 images shortlisted by the Royal Meteorological Society for the 2020 Weather Photographer of the Year prize show the world at its most atmospheric.

The shots are taken across the globe, including Scottish Isles, Patagonia, Vietnam and Belarus, and they show fog, rain, snow, hurricanes and resplendent sunshine to name just a few of the changeable conditions on display.

The 26 images have been shared by the Royal Meteorological Society (RMetS), in association with AccuWeather, and will now go to a public vote to decide the winner of the Weather Photographer of the Year 2020.

Click through the gallery above to see the shortlisted images, and read about them in the photographers' own words.

'Brooklyn Bridge in a Blizzard' by Rudolf Sulgan, one of the 26 images shortlisted for The Royal Meteorological Society's Weather Photographer of the Year 2020. Rudolf Sulgan
'Brooklyn Bridge in a Blizzard' by Rudolf Sulgan, one of the 26 images shortlisted for The Royal Meteorological Society's Weather Photographer of the Year 2020. Rudolf Sulgan

Directly or indirectly, many of the images pass comment on climate change.

My main concern and inspiration is that my images hopefully do a small part in combating climate change

Rudolf Sulgan, shortlisted for Weather Photographer of the Year 2020

"Global warming is the primary cause of the current sea level rise. As a result, hundreds of millions of people living in coastal areas will become increasingly vulnerable to flooding," said Rudolf Sulgan of his image, Brooklyn Bridge in a Blizzard.

"Higher sea levels would force them to abandon their homes and relocate. To combat this change in global temperature rise, we can reduce emissions and ensure communities have the resources they need to withstand the effects of climate change.

"Today’s choices will determine how high sea levels rise, how fast it occurs, and how much time we have to protect our communities. I made this image in 2018, during a strong blizzard as El Nino’s periodic warming of water often disrupts normal weather patterns.

My main concern and inspiration is that my images hopefully do a small part in combating climate change."

The public vote is open until midnight (BST), Friday, September 25, for more information or to vote, visit photocrowd.com/wpotyvote

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Read more:

2020 Moments: National Geographic urges region's photographers to share snapshots for competition

How four Sudanese artists joined forces to preserve the country's cultural past, present and future

Who is Misan Harriman? The first black male photographer to shoot British 'Vogue' cover in its 104-year history

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Updated: August 23, 2020 03:03 PM

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