x Abu Dhabi, UAEThursday 27 July 2017

Apple will still aim high after Jobs steps down

As Americans remember that bleak September 11 a decade ago, readers offer some very different views. Other letters touch on Apple after Jobs, Indian air routes, the US veto at the UN, and Dubai's Metro.

Readers share their opinions on what happened on September 11. One hails the heroism of the day, while another calls for more answers about who perpetrated the attacks. Spencer Platt / Getty Images / AFP
Readers share their opinions on what happened on September 11. One hails the heroism of the day, while another calls for more answers about who perpetrated the attacks. Spencer Platt / Getty Images / AFP

I think Apple will do a lot better without Steve Jobs's input than some analysts may think (Apple losing lustre without its guru, September 11).

He has a unique way of thinking about products which is very different from other companies, and developed a systematic process to do this that is now deeply rooted in the way the company operates.

Many companies fail because they don't listen to the market and discourage disagreement among their teams. Watching videos of Mr Jobs as he talks about the decision-making at Apple, product features and direction, you can see how he often loses arguments and is proven wrong . This is a man who thinks and listens deeply.

Mr Jobs has been ill for many years. He and his close team have had time to plan for what will happen after he steps down.

Long after Mr Jobs departs, people at Apple will be saying "What would Steve say about this?", and many will know pretty accurately what he would say.

I think Apple will continue to grow for many years to come.

Chris Payne, Al Ain

September 11 remembered

I was shocked to find in your newspaper an article written by Robert Matthews called How conspiracy theorists think (September 11).While the Moon landing theorists have been going at it for years based on circumstantial evidence, the issue of 9/11 is based on far more substantive and concrete evidence.

The confessions of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed do not mean anything more than that he was party to it. Who instigated it, who planned it and who executed it is still disputed.

I have no reason to believe that the people who support the official story are wrong but then again, I have no reason to believe that the people who don't believe it are wrong either.

Everyone knows that covert action happens. In order for covert action to take place, someone must think it up. That is the definition of a conspiracy. Thus, how can we dismiss what is not known just because what is known makes us comfortable?

Mishaal Kanoo, Dubai

They attacked a financial centre but couldn't destroy capitalism which will continue to make money.

They attacked a defence headquarters only to set off a relentless offensive by those armed forces. They sought more death and destruction (of the White House or Congress) only to be thwarted by those men who loved life, the heroes on United 93.

Nicholas York, Abu Dhabi

Air India clients should not suffer

It is surprising to note that India's comptroller and auditor general has recommended age-old protective measures to resurrect economic viability to the legislature (India wants to restrict Gulf flights to help Air India, September 9).

It is hoped that India's legislature and prime minister will carefully evaluate the recommendation so that customers are not subjected to poor service and higher fares.

In the early 1990s, at the time of economic liberalisation, all public sector undertakings were warned of the risks from opening up the economy for growth. Air India was aware of the imminent open-sky policy.

It is hoped that the legislature will draw from the recent Canadian experience and protect the ongoing excellent arrangements to foster healthy competition rather than adopt the narrow measures being recommended.

RKS, Abu Dhabi

US veto violates worldwide wish

Is a US veto in the UN Security Council that is designed to frustrate the majority wishes of the 193 member states of the United Nations an abuse of power?

The United States, acting on behalf of the American Israeli lobby, has intimated that it will veto an application by the Palestinian Authority for recognition of a Palestinian state comprising all of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, plus official membership of the United Nations. After a veto, the proposal will probably be put before the UN General Assembly.

Given that the US represents 308 million people out of a membership of 193 states representing more than six billion people, is not the use of the power of veto directly against the interests and wishes of the global community and therefore an abuse of power that should in future be prohibited?

John Kidd, London

Full speed ahead for Dubai Metro

The article Dubai Ruler inaugurates metro Green Line (September 10) shows that after the global recession, Dubai is moving forward, in infrastructure and trade.

The new line will help the city's residents and ease traffic congestion. As has been said, Dubai will have many more surprises in the coming days.

K Ragavan, India

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