x Abu Dhabi, UAEWednesday 26 July 2017

Afghanistan cricket team deserves success

A reader applauds the Afghan cricketers who defeated Scotland in Sharjah. Other topics: pay TV, Hugo Chavez and redback spiders.

A reader says the Afghanistan cricket team, including bowler Aftab Alam, should be proud of their success against Scotland in Sharjah, but there are still many challenges ahead. Jake Badger / The National
A reader says the Afghanistan cricket team, including bowler Aftab Alam, should be proud of their success against Scotland in Sharjah, but there are still many challenges ahead. Jake Badger / The National

Pay TV should be cheaper, with better packages

In reference to Pirate TV costing networks 'millions' (March 10), I think home entertainment should be available for a cheaper price.

People watch television to de-stress and enjoy time with their families. It's a very important aspect of our day-to-day lives in the UAE.

Yet television services are sold at prices which can run into hundreds of dirhams every month.

To kill off the pirate boxes, the local networks should introduce more attractive and cheaper programme packages.

Moiz SA, Sharjah

Another side to solar solution

I would like to question the conclusion made in Why rooftop solar feed-ins may not be the best policy for the UAE (March 10).

Why are rooftop solar panels considered too expensive to clean and maintain? From my experience they are not - providing that the householders know what they are doing.

There has also been significant growth in the UAE in recent years. For example, most of Khalifa City in Abu Dhabi did not exist five years ago, and solar panels could have been incorporated into its design.

The article suggests having solar energy plants in the remote desert, but these would be more exposed to damaging sandstorms and delivery to the grid could be a problem.

M Carr, Abu Dhabi

Chavez's ideology will be his legacy

Chavez leaves a mixed legacy in the Middle East after supporting Palestinians - and tyrants (March 10) clearly underlines Hugo Chavez's influence in this region.

The world is going to miss his daring personality.

It has been reported that more than two million people gathered to witness his cremation, which is an indication of the acceptance he received.

Even though some intellectuals have seen Chavez's untimely demise as an ending, the ideology that he left behind for his successors is precious.

For some, Chavez was best known for his autocratic rule and aggressive outlook, particularly when dealing with the US and its western allies.

But the popularity he enjoyed in his lifetime proved that he was much more than an administrator; he also played the role of a mentor.

Perhaps no other leader will ever enjoy such comprehensive support from the Venezuelan people.

Ramachandran Nair, Oman

Afghan cricketers deserve applause

I was happy to read Sharjah's field of Afghan dreams (March 10), about the success of the cricket team from Afghanistan against Scotland.

Afghanistan's team has played brilliantly in this series so far.

However, they should not be relaxed, because there are still four more games to win before they can qualify for the 2015 ICC Cricket World Cup.

H Qullah, Abu Dhabi

London cable car is going nowhere

London cable car attraction under fire (March 9) caught my attention.

That's just what Britain needs in a time of austerity - a white elephant transport system that does not connect to the Underground network.

As a British expatriate, I am merely thankful that I do not live in London.

P Nixon, Abu Dhabi

Spray will keep spiders at bay

There is no need for residents to fear the redback spiders found in some parts of Dubai (Experts call for calm after venomous spiders found, March 8).

They are only harmful if they are threatened.

The careful use of an appropriate spray in and around the home will control them.

Ali Al Samarrai, Sharjah

English language best for teaching

Unfortunately, English is the universal language, and if the UAE wants to continue to attract expatriate families, English must be the primary language for teaching.

Sylvia Moore, Dubai