x Abu Dhabi, UAETuesday 25 July 2017

A lot to do for Pakistan coach Dav Whatmore in the one-day format

Pakistan sides are usually judged on their success in limited-overs cricket, though, at least they are by the majority of their public. Which is a good thing for Whatmore.

Dav Whatmore arrived in Lahore on Friday.
Dav Whatmore arrived in Lahore on Friday.

Timing can be just as important in coaching as it is at the batting crease. For example, Duncan Fletcher's timing has been a little askew for a while now.

The former Zimbabwe all-rounder was establishing a fine reputation for himself when he oversaw England's first Ashes win since the Middle Ages back in 2005.

Then he timed his exit poorly. When his side suffered a whitewash in the return Ashes, and put up a woeful performance in the 2007 World Cup on his watch, it sullied all his previous good work.

And what did he have to gain from taking on the India job when he did? They were No 1 in the Test game and had just won the 50 over World Cup, so it was not possible to take them anywhere but down.

At which point on the curve has Dav Whatmore chosen to enter Pakistan cricket?

Given the way the fortunes of Pakistan cricket generally oscillates so wildly, not just from series to series but day to day, it is difficult to tell.

Misbah-ul-Haq, the Pakistan captain, has already navigated the Test team through two changes of coach, first Waqar Younis and now Mohsin Khan, and the side remain in good health when wearing white.

Pakistan sides are usually judged on their success in limited-overs cricket, though, at least they are by the overwhelming majority of their public.

Which is a good thing for Whatmore. There is plenty of room for improvement for a side who were just whitewashed by England in conditions favouring them, and who lie sixth in the rankings.

It does not need to be quite as spectacular as the job he did with Sri Lanka in 1996, but a little bit of magic should not be beyond Whatmore in his latest role.

 

pradley@thenational.ae