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In pictures: Jordan elections

January 23, 2013

The boycott has reduced the election to a contest between tribal leaders, establishment figures and businessmen, with just a few of the 1,500 candidates running for recognised parties. Ali Jarekji / Reuters
The boycott has reduced the election to a contest between tribal leaders, establishment figures and businessmen, with just a few of the 1,500 candidates running for recognised parties. Ali Jarekji / Reuters
David Martin, the chief observer of European Union Election Observing Mission to Jordan, opens a polling station in Amman. Ali Jarekji / Reuters
David Martin, the chief observer of European Union Election Observing Mission to Jordan, opens a polling station in Amman. Ali Jarekji / Reuters
Election officials show an empty ballot box before it is sealed prior to voting. Muhammad Hammad / Reuters
Election officials show an empty ballot box before it is sealed prior to voting. Muhammad Hammad / Reuters
A woman is helped to cast her ballot at a polling station in Amman on Wednesday. Polling stations across the country opened at 7am for Jordan's first election since Arab Spring protests. Muhammad Hammad / Reuters
A woman is helped to cast her ballot at a polling station in Amman on Wednesday. Polling stations across the country opened at 7am for Jordan's first election since Arab Spring protests. Muhammad Hammad / Reuters
A woman helps her grandmother cast her vote to elected members of the kingdom's parliament. The vote was boycotted by Islamists led by the Muslim Brotherhood. Muhammad Hammad / Reuters
A woman helps her grandmother cast her vote to elected members of the kingdom's parliament. The vote was boycotted by Islamists led by the Muslim Brotherhood. Muhammad Hammad / Reuters
A woman has her identity documents checked by an observer as she arrives at a polling station in Al Salt. The Muslim Brotherhood has shunned the poll saying the electoral system had been rigged against large, populated urban areas where it is strongest in???
A woman has her identity documents checked by an observer as she arrives at a polling station in Al Salt. The Muslim Brotherhood has shunned the poll saying the electoral system had been rigged against large, populated urban areas where it is strongest in???
Jordan's prime minister Abdullah Ensour, second right, gestures after refusing to skip the voting line, at a polling station in Al-Salt. The government has promised free and fair polls and predicted a good turnout, despite the boycott. Mohammad Hannon / A???
Jordan's prime minister Abdullah Ensour, second right, gestures after refusing to skip the voting line, at a polling station in Al-Salt. The government has promised free and fair polls and predicted a good turnout, despite the boycott. Mohammad Hannon / A???
Jordanians queue outside a polling station in the Palestinian refugee camp of Baqaa, north of Amman Khalil Mazraawi / AFP Photo
Jordanians queue outside a polling station in the Palestinian refugee camp of Baqaa, north of Amman Khalil Mazraawi / AFP Photo

A Jordanian observer cuts the voter ID card of a woman after she casts her vote. AFP
A Jordanian observer cuts the voter ID card of a woman after she casts her vote. AFP