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Adly Mansour (left) is congratulated by judges during a ceremony in which he was sworn in as head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, in Cairo.
Adly Mansour (left) is congratulated by judges during a ceremony in which he was sworn in as head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, in Cairo.

Little-known judge Adly Al Mansour enthroned by Egypt's army

The 67-year-old father of three, who won a scholarship to France's most prestigious institute of higher education, the Ecole nationale d'administration, was a long-serving judge under the regime of the former strongman, Hosni Mubarak.

CAIRO // Egypt's new caretaker president, Adly Al Mansour, had been head of the Supreme Constitutional Court for just two days when the army named him leader of the Arab world's most populous state.

Despite his previously low profile, the judge came across as statesmanlike in a nationally televised oath-taking ceremony, during which he hailed Wednesday's overthrow of Mohammed Morsi.

"I swear to preserve the system of the republic, and respect the constitution and law, and guard the people's interests," he said.

He saluted the Egyptian people "for correcting on June 30 the path of this glorious revolution", in reference to protests that saw millions take to the streets to demand the resignation of the Islamist president.

He also praised the armed forces for having "always been the conscience of the nation" and "not hesitating for a moment to meet the call of the nation and people".

Ironically, Mr Al Mansour was named by Mr Morsi to Egypt's top judicial post in May and took up his functions on July 1.

The 67-year-old father of three, who won a scholarship to France's most prestigious institute of higher education, the Ecole nationale d'administration, was a long-serving judge under the regime of the former strongman, Hosni Mubarak.

Mr Al Mansour helped draft the supervision law for the presidential elections that brought Mr Morsi to power in 2012, which included setting a legal timeframe for electoral campaigning.

He was deputy head of the Supreme Constitutional Court from 1992.

Unlike the principal leaders of the opposition - among them a Nobel Peace laureate, Mohamed ElBaradei, and a former Arab League chief, Amr Moussa - Mr Al Mansour was never a household name.

But that probably served the military's purposes in their search for a neutral figurehead for a potentially rollercoaster transition.

The white-haired, bespectacled judge could probably have walked through one of the huge opposition protests that swept the country on Sunday prompting the military's dramatic intervention without being recognised.

With the constitution suspended, Mr Al Mansour has been granted powers to issue constitutional declarations until a new charter is written.

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