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Three doses of the PCV-7 vaccine are recommended before the age of six months.
Three doses of the PCV-7 vaccine are recommended before the age of six months.

Vaccine may be effective in fewer doses

New discoveries in laboratories and in surveys can help you raise a healthy child who will mature into a healthy adult.

A study in the July issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that fewer shots of the pneumococcal vaccine can still effectively protect infants against pneumonia and other infections. The current recommendation for 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) is three doses before the age of six months and a booster vaccination at two years. Factors such as cost effectiveness have led researchers to examine reduced-dose vaccine schedules.

Prescription drugs in the UAE are significantly more expensive than in other parts of the world, a World Health Organization survey has revealed. Some medicines can cost up to 23 times more than the recommended international price. The most shocking example of overpricing was the drug Ciprofloxacin, which is used to treat severe and life-threatening bacterial infections. Doctors say some patients are resorting to buying cheaper, perhaps less reliable products abroad. Pharmacists say wholesale costs are so high they are barely making a profit.

Prospective university students in Canada are being warned to safeguard their personal information from marketers setting up fake academic groups on Facebook. Several fraudulent groups targeting students at Canadian universities were shut down in June. Many sported official school logos. Students are encouraged not to join carelessly. The groups are designed for gathering personal information for databases that are later sold and as a channel for advertising.

This month's Health Psychology includes a study showing that children are more likely to be active if their parents are active. An experiment that included 681 parents and 433 children found that children of parents who valued sports watched less TV, spent less time on their computers and were generally more active than other children. The study found that girls were not as encouraged to participate in high-intensity exercise, and that the parents' approval of exercise had a greater influence on boys.

Another study in July's Health Psychology suggests television ads trigger mindless eating, especially in children. Yale University researchers experimented on kids aged seven to 11; those who watched a half-hour cartoon that included food commercials ate 45 per cent more snack items than those who watched the same cartoon with non-food commercials. This could equate to a child putting on 10 extra pounds per year unless TV viewing is counteracted with increased levels of exercise and decreased intake of other foods, researchers said. "This research shows a direct and powerful link between television food advertising and calories consumed by adults and children," said Jennifer Harris, the lead author of the study and the director of marketing initiatives at the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale.

Swedish researchers have found a possible link between birth by Caesarean section and an increased risk for immunological diseases such as diabetes and asthma later in life. Published in this month's Acta Paediatrica, the study found changes to the DNA of white blood cells in babies born by Caesarean section. They had higher DNA-methylation rates immediately after delivery, which are a key part of the immune system. The researchers explain that this is due to the high stress in C-section births but admit further studies are needed to prove and explain the link.

A report published in this month's Archives of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine has found that taking part in team sports lowers the odds of children smoking but cannot compete with the influence of smoking in movies. As many as 30 to 50 per cent of adolescent smokers attribute their habit to seeing it in movies, the study found. Parents are urged to take note of what their kids are watching on TV and to use the internet to find out whether a movie has smoking scenes in it.

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 Styled with bleached bobs and pale skin, the models wore clean and sporty separates reminiscent of the chic workwear of The Hunger Games. Courtesy Getty Images

Fashion Forward: Thoughtful tailoring at Asudari

The womenswear label Asudari showcased a collection that featured sharp masculine tailoring, but with feminine silhouettes.

Styled with bleached bobs and pale skin, the models wore clean and sporty separates reminiscent of the chic workwear of The Hunger Games.

Designer Lamia Asudari says she was influenced by Delftware ceramics from the 16th century, as well as the imagery of weaponry and artillery. Indeed, pistols, grenades and guns were emblazoned over jackets and dresses.

 Several of Jo Baaklini's pieces featured fruit prints. Courtesy Getty Images

Fashion Forward: At Starch, watermelon shirts, anyone?

“We need to cultivate our own fashion heroes — our own regional brands,” stressed Fashion Forward’s honcho Bong Guerrero in a press con two weeks ago.

Aptly, the slot for this season’s opening runway show was given to two newbies: Jo Baaklini and Timi Hayek, whose talents were scouted by Starch, a group dedicated to launching emerging Lebanese designers.

Between the two, Mr Baaklini had a stronger showing.

 Jean Louis Sabaji’s collection was very good when the tricks were toned down — like the simple white jumpsuit with a sculptural neckpiece. Stuart C. Wilson / Getty Images

Fashion Forward: Jean Louis Sabaji’s debatable debut

Jean Louis Sabaji’s collection was very good when the tricks were toned down — like the simple white jumpsuit with a sculptural neckpiece, the floral crop top, and the radiant yellow pleated skirt.

But most of the time he went too far. There were bell-bottoms, separates that looked like costumes from The Jetsons, and a yellow dress reminiscent of Bjork’s infamous Oscars swan dress — several disparate elements in one multicoloured, multilayered show.

 Launched in 2009 by childhood friends Arwa Abdelhadi and Basma Abu Ghazaleh, Kage bills itself as a label whose “ultimate goal is to design a collection appealing to all.” Courtesy Getty Images

Fashion Forward: Kage pleases all palates

Did the designers of Kage aim to showcase every type of basic clothing on their latest show?

Because there were skirts, shorts, trousers, off-shoulder tops, short dresses, cocktail dresses, long flowy dresses, spaghetti straps, jackets, hoods — and even pyjamas, which with the incoming summer heat, looked especially appealing.

Launched in 2009 by childhood friends Arwa Abdelhadi and Basma Abu Ghazaleh, Kage bills itself as a label whose “ultimate goal is to design a collection appealing to all”, they said in their statement.

 The standout was a grey hooded cape that created a tension between edge and elegance. Courtesy Getty Images

Fashion Forward: Polish, craft (and fur!) at The Emperor 1688

The best show of Day 1 at Fashion Forward was delivered by the three Golkar brothers behind The Emperor 1688.

The coats and capes were the clear winners: they came in all sorts of interesting colours and sizes — and featured exceptionally tailored proportions. There was a lot of volume, but also stiffness.

And whimsy: two favourites were a green double-breasted suit and a blue overcoat with a red clover pattern and gold buttons.

 Midway through Ezra's show, snow started falling from the ceiling. Ian Gavan / Getty Images for Fashion Forward

Fashion Forward: Ezra stuns in snow-covered show

Turns out the Filipino designer Ezra, known for his dreamy couture, still had a few surprises up his sleeve.

Midway through his show, snow started falling from the ceiling.

It created a starkly beautiful atmosphere for his intricately constructed gowns that seemed to be designed for an Ice Queen transported back to the 1950s.

He showed a collection that had a lot of technical firepower behind it: glittering iridescent fabrics paired with head and neckpieces that were moulded and stiffened to stand out in odd angles.

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