Text size:

  • Small
  • Normal
  • Large
Shaima al Sayed was introduced to the Nissan Altima by her brother: "It's a very big car, yet very sporty. I have had it so long that I know its dimensions blindly."
AMY LEANG PHOTOGRAPHER
Shaima al Sayed was introduced to the Nissan Altima by her brother: 'It's a very big car, yet very sporty. I have had it so long that I know its dimensions blindly.'

My car: 2005 Nissan Altima

Squeals and gear problems have not stopped Emirati project manager Shaima al Sayed loving her Nissan.

Shaima al Sayed may be a project manager by day, but when she's not hard at work, she enjoys going to football matches and driving her 2005 Nissan Altima.

The Ajman resident has owned the car for more than five years and she is keen to hold on to it for a while yet. She considered buying the 2010 Altima Coupe but she says that, for now, "I'm keeping my baby".

Al Sayed was going to buy a 4x4 but her brother steered her in the direction of the Altima, which was not quite as common on UAE roads back in 2005.

"I absolutely love it," she says. "It's a big car, yet very sporty. I have had it so long that I know its dimensions blindly.

"My option for a saloon car was it had to be economical, spacious and sporty. The first time I drove it, I fell in love with it instantly - my first owned car, and I have never regretted having it at all."

But the mighty Altima has not been without its issues: "The Altima from 2005 to 2007 actually has a gear problem," says al Sayed. "I had my share of it - it was the worst when my car would not shift out of the first gear and the maximum I could drive was 45kph, but that was quite some time back.

"The other problem it has is the squealing a/c belt; I have learnt to handle that with a few tricks."

She explains that although the mechanic told her the whining noise cannot be fixed, she just puts the car into neutral as she brakes, which seems to help "avoid all the screeching and wailing".

Al Sayed proudly declares that she is not a stereotypical female driver, which she describes as: "You know, very straight seat, too close to the steering [wheel], clutching to the steering wheel with two tight palms, rigid head movements, fixed sight to the front, 100kph or less in the first lane, and taking 10 minutes on average to change lanes."

When al Sayed got rid of the dark tint on her windows, she says other drivers were surprised to see it was a woman behind the wheel: "I have had many guys drop jaws when after some time, they find out it's a girl driving confidently and daringly, and not a man."

When she first got her car, she says there weren't too many on the road, but this didn't stop her from getting involved in an embarrassing incident: "I had gone out with friends, and left my car in the parking lot of some building, and when I came back, we opened the car door, and to my shock there was this couple inside deep in conversation," she recalls.

"I almost swore at them, then realised it was not my car, but just the exact make and colour, and my car was hidden out of sight by a bus.

"The guy got out and he wasn't mad, actually he was explaining that he and his girlfriend were doing nothing immoral and were just chatting and he was actually going to drop her home. He must have thought we were CID or something!"

Aside from getting mistaken for a member of the police force, al Sayed has also used her car to help out a good cause: She is one of the organisers of the annual Unity Drive, an all-woman drive through all seven Emirates for UAE National Day. The Altima has been a faithful companion on these drives for the past three years and it looks like this year, it will again be called into action on December 2. She is looking forward to this year's drive, which will be to raise awareness for breast cancer screening, diabetes and special needs children in the UAE.

Back to the top

More articles


Editor's Picks

 Styled with bleached bobs and pale skin, the models wore clean and sporty separates reminiscent of the chic workwear of The Hunger Games. Courtesy Getty Images

Fashion Forward: Thoughtful tailoring at Asudari

The womenswear label Asudari showcased a collection that featured sharp masculine tailoring, but with feminine silhouettes.

Styled with bleached bobs and pale skin, the models wore clean and sporty separates reminiscent of the chic workwear of The Hunger Games.

Designer Lamia Asudari says she was influenced by Delftware ceramics from the 16th century, as well as the imagery of weaponry and artillery. Indeed, pistols, grenades and guns were emblazoned over jackets and dresses.

 Several of Jo Baaklini's pieces featured fruit prints. Courtesy Getty Images

Fashion Forward: At Starch, watermelon shirts, anyone?

“We need to cultivate our own fashion heroes — our own regional brands,” stressed Fashion Forward’s honcho Bong Guerrero in a press con two weeks ago.

Aptly, the slot for this season’s opening runway show was given to two newbies: Jo Baaklini and Timi Hayek, whose talents were scouted by Starch, a group dedicated to launching emerging Lebanese designers.

Between the two, Mr Baaklini had a stronger showing.

 Jean Louis Sabaji’s collection was very good when the tricks were toned down — like the simple white jumpsuit with a sculptural neckpiece. Stuart C. Wilson / Getty Images

Fashion Forward: Jean Louis Sabaji’s debatable debut

Jean Louis Sabaji’s collection was very good when the tricks were toned down — like the simple white jumpsuit with a sculptural neckpiece, the floral crop top, and the radiant yellow pleated skirt.

But most of the time he went too far. There were bell-bottoms, separates that looked like costumes from The Jetsons, and a yellow dress reminiscent of Bjork’s infamous Oscars swan dress — several disparate elements in one multicoloured, multilayered show.

 Launched in 2009 by childhood friends Arwa Abdelhadi and Basma Abu Ghazaleh, Kage bills itself as a label whose “ultimate goal is to design a collection appealing to all.” Courtesy Getty Images

Fashion Forward: Kage pleases all palates

Did the designers of Kage aim to showcase every type of basic clothing on their latest show?

Because there were skirts, shorts, trousers, off-shoulder tops, short dresses, cocktail dresses, long flowy dresses, spaghetti straps, jackets, hoods — and even pyjamas, which with the incoming summer heat, looked especially appealing.

Launched in 2009 by childhood friends Arwa Abdelhadi and Basma Abu Ghazaleh, Kage bills itself as a label whose “ultimate goal is to design a collection appealing to all”, they said in their statement.

 The standout was a grey hooded cape that created a tension between edge and elegance. Courtesy Getty Images

Fashion Forward: Polish, craft (and fur!) at The Emperor 1688

The best show of Day 1 at Fashion Forward was delivered by the three Golkar brothers behind The Emperor 1688.

The coats and capes were the clear winners: they came in all sorts of interesting colours and sizes — and featured exceptionally tailored proportions. There was a lot of volume, but also stiffness.

And whimsy: two favourites were a green double-breasted suit and a blue overcoat with a red clover pattern and gold buttons.

 Midway through Ezra's show, snow started falling from the ceiling. Ian Gavan / Getty Images for Fashion Forward

Fashion Forward: Ezra stuns in snow-covered show

Turns out the Filipino designer Ezra, known for his dreamy couture, still had a few surprises up his sleeve.

Midway through his show, snow started falling from the ceiling.

It created a starkly beautiful atmosphere for his intricately constructed gowns that seemed to be designed for an Ice Queen transported back to the 1950s.

He showed a collection that had a lot of technical firepower behind it: glittering iridescent fabrics paired with head and neckpieces that were moulded and stiffened to stand out in odd angles.

Events

To add your event to The National listings, click here

Get the most from The National