Text size:

  • Small
  • Normal
  • Large
Ligne Roset's 2009 re-edition of the chair, in natural beech and black-tinted beech will be available this summer, priced at around ?1,200 (Dh5,560).
Ligne Roset's 2009 re-edition of the chair, in natural beech and black-tinted beech will be available this summer, priced at around ?1,200 (Dh5,560).

Curule armchair by Ligne Rose

Object of desire An archetypal piece of design, characterised by its x-shaped base, the curule chair dates from ancient times, when it was a seat of honour reserved for prominent and powerful people.

Among the items on Ligne Roset's vast stand at Maison & Objet last month, it might have been easy to overlook the modestly scaled and quietly elegant Curule folding chair. But that would have meant missing a beautifully made re-edition of one of the late 20th century's iconic pieces of furniture. An archetypal piece of design, characterised by its x-shaped base, the curule chair dates from ancient times, when it was a seat of honour reserved for prominent and powerful people.

Creating his contemporary, folding version in 1982, Pierre Paulin - a pioneer of the Modern movement - refined it to its essentials, doing away with embellishments to capture the very essence of the form. It is this simplicity that makes the chair timeless yet utterly contemporary, the purity of form that emphasises the quality of materials and finish. First produced as a prototype for the Mobilier National (the French national furniture collection), Paulin's chair was taken into the permanent collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris in 1983. It was made as a limited edition by the designer's eponymous company before being put into production by Artcurial in 1988. Those originals are now prized collectors' items.

Ligne Roset's 2009 re-edition of the chair, in natural beech and black-tinted beech - rather than the original light sycamore and amaranth wood - will be available this summer, priced at around ?1,200 (Dh5,560). www.ligneroset.com

Back to the top

More articles


Editor's Picks

 Iranian President Hassan Rouhani greeted by university students as he leaves Sistan University in Sistan and Baluchestan’s provincial capital of Zahedan on Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Maryam Rahmanian for The National

In Iran’s most troubled province, Rouhani hears pleas for change

Hassan Rounani aims to connect with residents of far-flung Sistan and Baluchestan province.

 Prince Bandar bin Sultan in Riyadh on March 3, 2007. Hassan Ammar / AFP Photo

Saudi Prince Bandar promised a victory he could not deliver

Saudi Arabia's controversial intelligence chief stepped down this week after rumours that his policies on Syria had fallen out of favour.

 Iranian President Hassan Rouhani greets supporters after his arrival in Zahedan, the regional capital of Sistan and Baluchestan province on Tuesday, April 15, 2014. During Mr Rouhani's two-day visit, he will tour several other cities and hold meetings with local scholars and entrepreneurs. Maryam Rahmanian for The National

On the road with Hassan Rouhani

Iran's president is touring some of Iran's most underdeveloped provinces. Foreign correspondent Yeganeh Salehi is traveling with him.

 Twitter photo of  Abdel Fattah El Sisi on the campaign trail on March 30. Photo courtesy-Twitter/@SisiCampaign

El Sisi rides a bicycle, kicks off social media storm

The photos and video created a huge buzz across social media networks, possibly a marker of a new era for Egypt.

 Friday is UN Mine Awareness Day and Omer Hassan, who does demining work in Iraqi Kurdistan, is doing all he can to teach people about the dangers posed by landmines. Louise Redvers for The National

A landmine nearly ended Omer’s life but he now works to end the threat of mines in Iraq

Omer Hassan does demining work in Iraqi Kurdistan and only has to show people his mangled leg to underscore the danger of mines. With the world marking UN Mine Awareness Day on Friday, his work is as important as ever as Iraq is one of the most mine-affected countries in the world.

 Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Turkish spiritual leader Fethullah Gulen. AFP Photo

The inner workings of Gulen’s ‘parallel state’

Fethullah Gulen's followers are accused of trying to push Turkey's prime minister from power.

Events

To add your event to The National listings, click here

Get the most from The National