Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers

  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers
  • Breaking the shadows: Roberto Schmidt charts the daily lives of Geddani ship-breakers

Geddani's ship-breaking yards employ some 10,000 workers including welders, cleaners, crane operators and worker supervisors. The yards are one of the largest ship-breaking operations in the world rivaling in size those located in India and Bangladesh. It takes 50 workers about three months to break down a midsize average transport sea vessel of about 40,000 tonnes. The multimillion-dollar ship-breaking industry contributes significantly to the national supply of steel to Pakistani industries. For a six-day working week of hard and often dangerous work handling asbestos, heavy metals and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), employees get paid about 300 USD a month of which half is spent on food and rent for run-down rickety shacks near the yards.

This beautiful set of images by Agence France Press photographer Roberto Schmidt illustrate the daily life of the Geddani ship-breakers.

Edited and sequenced by photo editor James O'Hara

     
       
         
           
             
               
                 
                   
                     
                       
                         
                           
                             
                               
                                 
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